Posts Tagged With: vocabulary

Back to Basics- Sleep

Back to Basics- Sleep

We all need our rest. Some of us are active during the day and some of us are active during the night. When an animal is active all depends on their lifestyle. Not all animals rest much and some rest many hours. We are going to learn some terms for all of these adaptations!

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Nocturnal: being active at night. Animals that are nocturnal are primarily active during the evening and night and sleep during the day. Animals have many reasons to be nocturnal; it helps protect them from predators, their prey may be nocturnal too and it helps them avoid the heat of the day.

Aye-ayes are nocturnal animals. They forage for bugs in the trees at night.

aye aye

 

Diurnal: being active during the day. Many animals are active during the day, including many reptiles who bask in the sun for warmth and energy.

Meerkats spend their days looking for grubs and sleep in their burrows at night.

meerkat

 

 

Crepuscular: an animal is active during twilight- dawn or dusk. Many animals are most active during the dawn and dusk, like lions. These times are great to avoid the heat of the day. Also it’s a good time for animals who often are prey to hide in the darker light.

Rabbits are most active at dawn and dusk.

rabbit

 

Some fun sleep facts:

  • Elephants only sleep around 3-4 hours a night. And yes we sleep standing up and so do horses!
  • Brown bats sleep around 20 hours.
  • Giraffes sleep only around 2 hours a day.
  • Not all animals must rest in one large chunk. They can catch little naps here and there.
  • Bats do sleep upside down.
  • Dolphins and some whales are conscious breathers- they must think about breathing. When they rest/sleep they only rest half of their brain at one time so the other half can help them breath!
  • Birds who spend most of their life soaring in the air, take power naps in short intervals!
Categories: adventure, Animals, Children, conservation, education, Environment, nature, science, Today's Post, vocabulary, wildlife | Tags: , , , , , , , , | 1 Comment

Back to Basics- Symbiosis

Back to Basics- Symbiosis

Symbiosis is a big word! Edmond thought he would teach you how to pronounce it before we explained more about it.

Symbiosis: interaction between two different organisms living in close physical association, typically to the advantage of both.

    -Mutualism: symbiosis that is beneficial to both organisms involved. (Ex- anemones and clownfish)

clown

     -Commensalism: a relationship between individuals of two species in which one species obtains food or other benefits from the other without either harming or benefiting the latter. (Ex- yellow tangs and sea turtle)

turtle

      -Parasitism: relationship in which one organism (the parasite) benefits and the other (the host) is generally harmed. Parasites derive nutrition from their host and may also gain other benefits such as shelter and a habitat in which to grow and reproduce. (Ex- barnacles)

barnacles

 

Now you know all about symbiosis, including how to pronounce it!

Categories: adventure, Animals, Children, conservation, education, Environment, nature, science, Today's Post, vocabulary, wildlife | Tags: , , , , , , , , , | 1 Comment

Back to Basics- Producers/Consumers

Back to Basics- Producers/Consumers

We learned all the vocabulary for what animals are called by what they eat! Today we are talking a bit more about the food web with producers and consumers!

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Plants/Producers: Plants produce their own food. They convert energy from the sun, carbon dioxide and water from the soil to make glucose/sugar. This is called photosynthesis.

Animals/Consumers: Animals get their energy/food from other sources since they can not produce it themselves. They consumer either plants, other animals or both to live.

Consumers are broken down in to three categories:

Primary: animals that are herbivores.

Secondary: animals that are omnivores and carnivores.

Tertiary: animals are often called apex predators. They are at the top of the of the food chain. They are either carnivores or omnivores.

Fungus/Bacteria/Decomposers: Decomposers break down decaying organic (plant/animal) material and return it to the soil! Some insects do this also.

 

As you can begin to imagine, the food web is a delicate balance! If you remove one animal/plant from a the ecosystem then you can put the whole system out of whack and endanger certain animals. If a apex predator disappears, then a primary consumer can overpopulate and their resources can reach capacity!

sea otter

At one time the southern sea otter was hunted to very low numbers. These carnivores eat urchins and keep their populations in check. The urchins eat kelp. When there are no sea otters to eat the urchins, the urchins begin to eat the kelp forest at alarming rates. Without the kelp forest, many other fish and invertebrates would lose their habitat. As the otters populations have grown after being protected, the balance of the kelp forest has been restored!

 

 

Categories: adventure, Animals, Children, conservation, education, Environment, nature, science, Today's Post, vocabulary, wildlife | Tags: , , , , , , , , , | 1 Comment

SCIENCE WORD OF THE WEEK!

SCIENCE WORD OF THE WEEK!

swow cetacean

Hello class and happy Monday! Things are really buzzing around the University this week and it all starts here with our science word of the week!

Today’s word is Cetacean: a marine mammal from the order of Cetacea. Cetaceans include whales, dolphins and porpoises. 

I know Ellie and Edmond and professor Bertie are so excited to meet some of these awesome creatures this week! I hope you’re excited too!

Categories: adventure, Animals, Children, conservation, education, Environment, nature, science, vocabulary, wildlife | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , | 2 Comments

SCIENCE WORD OF THE WEEK!

SCIENCE WORD OF THE WEEK!

swow intertidal zone

Hello students! Welcome back from spring break! We’re starting this week off with a great word! Let’s get the learning started!

Today’s word is Intertidal Zone:  the intertidal zone is where the ocean and land meet. The intertidal zone changes during low and high tide. You can find all kinds of animals in the intertidal zone like crabs, anemones, seastars and muscles.

Categories: adventure, Animals, Children, conservation, education, Environment, nature, science, vocabulary, wildlife | Tags: , , , , , , , , , | 1 Comment

SCIENCE WORD OF THE WEEK!

SCIENCE WORD OF THE WEEK

Sketches - 27

Hello students! Welcome back to vocabulary class! It has been a long break for me, but I am back and ready to learn some cool science words! Are you?

Today’s word is: Folivore: is a herbivore that specializes in eating leaves. Some examples of folivores include hoatzin, pandas, koalas, giraffes, sloths, caterpillars and iguanas.

I know Ellie and Edmond and some of the other professors are excited for you to meet some of these leaf eaters this week! Say hi to them for me!

Categories: adventure, Animals, Children, conservation, education, Environment, nature, science, wildlife | Tags: , , , , , , , , , | 1 Comment

SCIENCE WORD OF THE WEEK!

SCIENCE WORD OF THE WEEK!

swow burrow

Hello class! Who’s ready for today’s lesson? I picked a word to go with Groundhog Day tomorrow!

So let’s get to it! Today’s word: Burrow- a hole or tunnel dug by an animal. A burrow serves as a shelter for either the animal who dug it or for an animal that may share that burrow with other animals.

Animals who live in burrows include rabbits, meerkats, gopher tortoises, prairie dogs, wombats and groundhogs!

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SCIENCE WORD OF THE WEEK!

SCIENCE WORD OF THE WEEK!

swow raptor

We’re back to Science Word class after skipping last week to celebrates some animal holidays! I’m excited for today’s lesson, so let’s get started.

Today’s word is Raptor: a raptor is a bird of prey that is a carnivore. The word raptor comes from a Latin word that means to capture or seize.

Raptors include hawks, owls, falcons, osprey, eagles, vultures and secretary birds. There are 446 species of raptors in the world.  Raptors have sharp claws or talons, curved sharp beaks and keen eyesight to help them catch their prey.

So as you may have guessed, Ellie and Edmond will be meeting some raptors this week!

Categories: adventure, Animals, Children, conservation, education, Environment, nature, science, vocabulary, wildlife | Tags: , , , , , , , , | 2 Comments

SCIENCE WORD OF THE WEEK!

SCIENCE WORD OF THE WEEK!

swow quad

Hello class! We have a great word for you today! Ellie and Edmond will be talking more about feet this week as it is feet week! Woohoo! I have a long claws on my front feet that help me climb and dig for ants and termites!

Today’s word is quadruped: when an animal uses four feet for locomotion (moving). Many animals walk on four feet. Just because an animal walks on all fours, doesn’t mean they do it the same. I actually walk on the side of my front feet due to those long claws. Ellie and Edmond will be sharing more fun feet facts as the week goes on!

Categories: adventure, Animals, Children, conservation, education, Environment, nature, science, vocabulary, wildlife | Tags: , , , , , , , , , | 2 Comments

SCIENCE WORD OF THE WEEK!

SCIENCE WORD OF THE WEEK!

swow entomologist

Welcome back to class this week! I have such a great word for you this week! We’re going to learn about another group of scientists in a specific field! This week Ellie and Edmond will be meeting some of the animals that these scientists study!

This week’s word is Entomologist: is a scientist who studies insects. With over a million species of insects that account for about 2/3 of the species of animals on the planet- entomologists have endless animals to study! If you were an entomologist what insects would you study? The famous E.O. Wilson studies ants!

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