fish

When You Put a Fish in a Box

When You Put a Fish in a Box

Hehehehe! We’re just kidding- we’re not putting fish in boxes today, but we are going snorkeling and meeting the boxfish! You campers may remember meeting Barry the Boxfish on World’s Oceans Day. Today we’re going to learn more about them.

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Boxfish Fun Facts: 

  • Boxfish can grow up to 18 inches.
  • These little omnivores eat algae, worms and crustaceans.
  • Boxfish are bright yellow as juvinelles. They get darker as they get older.
  • That bright coloration is called warning coloration. It serves as a warning to predators that it is toxic.
  • Boxfish excreate poison when threatened.
  • They are solitary.

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We love these cube shaped fish. A car company even thought their funny shape would make for a good car design. We wonder if they added the fins?

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Happy World Oceans Day!

Happy World Oceans Day

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Raccoon + Butterfly= Fish

Raccoon + Butterfly= Fish

We met another great animal during our snorkel trips- this time a wonderful reef fish- the raccoon butterflyfish! Meet them with us!

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Raccoon Butterflyfish Fun Facts: 

  • These Butterflyfish average 8 inches long.
  • They are nocturnal.
  • These carnivores each small invertebrates and nudibranch.
  • They have large eyes.
  • They prefer shallow reefs.
  • They have a false eyespot to fool predators.

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These little fish are fun! They are popular in aquariums too. We love their bright coloration!

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Hi Spot!

Hi Spot!

We spent the last few days snorkeling in and around the reefs around these magically islands. We met so many spectacular animals and we are sharing one with you today!

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Spotted Moray Eel: 

  • Spotted morays can grow up to 6 ft long and weigh up to 5 1/2 lbs.
  • These carnivores eat fish, mollusks and crustaceans.
  • Spotted morays have two sets of jaws. The first set is in the front of their mouths. The second set is in the esophagus. The second set of jaws grabs the prey and pushes it down the throat.
  • They have poor eyesight. They use their excellent sense of smell to locate prey.
  • They are nocturnal.
  • Typically spotted morays are nocturnal.
  • They are listed as Threatened by the ICUN.

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We had a blast snorkeling and it was even more special to meet the shy and elusive eels. They love to hide among the coral and in crevices in the rocks!

 

Categories: adventure, Animals, Children, conservation, education, elephants, Environment, fish, nature, oceans, science, Today's Post, wildlife | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , | 1 Comment

Piranha Relative

Piranha Relative

We decided to take a boat ride today to find some fish today! These funny round relatives of the piranha do not have the reputation of their cousins, but they’re no less cool!

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Pacu Fun Facts: 

  • Pacu are a fresh water fish.
  • They are herbivores and feed on aquatic plants.
  • They are famous for their square teeth that resemble human teeth.
  • Pacu can grow up to 3 1/2 feet and weigh up to 88 lbs.
  • Some of them have red on their bellies and some of them do not.

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These fish are popular in the aquarium trade. Unfortunately they can be dumped in local rivers where they are not native. They can interrupt a local ecosystem though.

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Pantanal

EPantanal

Did you guess where this month’s adventure is? We’re in Brazil in the Pantanal region! This amazing habitat is rich with plants and animals and we’re so excited to see as much as possible! Come learn more about the Pantanal today with us!

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Pantanal Fun Facts: 

  • The Pantanal is mostly wetlands. Those wetlands are submerged in water during the rainy season.
  • The average temperate is 77 degrees Fahrenheit (25 C).
  • Many of the species are aquatic.
  •  The word Pantanal comes from the Portogese word pantano that means wetland.
  • The average rainfall in this area is 40-55 inches.
  • There are about 3,500 plant species in this habitat.
  • This wetland is also home to almost 700 species of birds!

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This amazing habitat is very special. Unfornately on 2% of it is under protection. We will meet several animals that are endangered because of habitat loss. We hope you are ready to meet them with us!

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Halloween Week

Halloween Week

We are taking a break from our usual programming to share some fun animals that remind us of Halloween- one of our favorite holidays! We’re sharing a Not So True Halloween Facts and then we’ll share some true facts about the animal!

 

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Goblin Shark Fun Facts: 

  • Goblin sharks live in the deep ocean.
  • They are able to thrust their jaws forward out of their mouth by 3 inches.
  • They can grow up to 12 ft long.
  • Goblin sharks are found mostly off the coast of Japan.
  • They are thought to be solitary.
  • Their upper jaw contains up to 53 teeth and their lower jaw can contain up to 62 teeth!

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Categories: adventure, Animals, Children, conservation, education, endangered species, Environment, fish, nature, oceans, science, sharks, Today's Post, wildlife | Leave a comment

Back to Basics- Fish

Back to Basics- Fish

Time to brush up on your fish knowledge with professor Sylvia the Seahorse!

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Number of fish species- 24,000 and growing! Scientists discover new species all the time! We fish were the first vertebrate animals on the earth! We occupy the world’s oceans and fresh water bodies of water; including lakes, rivers and ponds.

Fish traits:

  • Fish have gills that we use to extract oxygen from water and expel carbon dioxide. They serve the same function as a mammal’s lungs.
  • Fish have scales. Our scales are different, some are smooth and some are rough. Sharks’ scales are called dermal denticles. Some fish like hagfish have no scales.
  • Fish have fins for swimming. Fins are shaped for the type of swimming a fish does- some are built for speed and some are small (like mine).
  • We fish are vertebrates, we all have back bones.
  • Most fish are exothermic, cold blooded.

Fish are classified in three groups; jawless fish (hagfish and lamprey- they also have no scales), cartilaginous (sharks and rays) and bony.

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Some fish lay eggs, some incubate their eggs in a womb and some incubate their young in wombs similar to mammals.

We fish can detect chemicals and vibrations. We often have keen eyesight and a great sense of smell.

Fish do have ears! Not big goofy ones like some mammals, but internal ones.

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We also have an extra “organ” to help us “hear” and detect vibrations. This is called the lateral-line. This line of cells runs the length of our bodies and helps us detect motion. Schooling fish who swim in synchronized groups use their lateral line to swim in these formations.

Sharks and rays have yet another “organ” that helps them detect electrical fields. It’s called the ampullae of Lorenzini, gel filled cells that help our cartilaginous cousins detect even the faintest of electrical fields. This is something no other animal can do!

We also have a swim bladder that keeps us buoyant in the water. Fresh water fish have a bigger swim bladder than salt water fish. Bony fish swim bladders are filled with a gas that is less dense than water. In cartilaginous fish, their swim bladder is a large oil rich liver that is less dense than water! 

 

Categories: adventure, Animals, Children, conservation, education, Environment, fish, nature, oceans, science, Today's Post, wildlife | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , | 1 Comment

Wear Your Bonnet

Wear Your Bonnet

Can you imagine a shark wearing a bonnet? That would be funny looking- not to mention hard to swim with- hahaha! Today we are meeting a relative of the hammerhead- the bonnethead shark!!

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Bonnethead Shark Fun Facts: 

  • Bonnetheads are smaller sharks- they can grow up to 59 inches- about the length of a refrigerator.
  • They call estuaries, bays and sandy bottoms their home.
  • Their heads are more rounded than that of the larger hammerhead species.
  • Like all other sharks they are carnivores.
  • Bonnethead sharks live in small groups.
  • They can live up to 15 years.

 

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These smaller hammerheads are so cool. A recent study by scientists may suggest that they eat sea grass, which would make them omnivores! Wow! That would be super cool!

Categories: adventure, aliens, Animals, camp, Children, conservation, education, endangered species, Environment, fish, oceans, science, Today's Post, wildlife | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , | 1 Comment

Know Your Sharks

Know Your Sharks

Today we have four coloring sheets for you in our continued series- know your sharks! So head on over to the craft cabin and grab something to color with and get to know your sharks!

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Pocket Sharks have two pouches or pockets, one on each side of their body in front of their fins. Scientists are unsure of their purpose.

 

 

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Bamboo Sharks are mostly nocturnal and only grow up to 37 inches long. 

 

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Zebra sharks lose their stripes as they grow. Adults are actually covered in spots!

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These large sharks (up to 14 ft) often rest on the ocean floor. They pump water over their gills using spiracles to pull in water. 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Categories: adventure, Animals, camp, Children, conservation, education, endangered species, Environment, fish, nature, oceans, science, Today's Post, wildlife | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , | 1 Comment

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