Posts Tagged With: adventure

We Hate To Say Goodbye

We Hate to Say Goodbye

It’s that time of the summer, when our campers pack up their trunks, gear, photos and get ready to go home. It’s such a bittersweet time. We sure have enjoyed sharing the ocean and all its inhabitants with you this year.

What was your favorite memory of camp? Who was your favorite animal?

Thank you for joining us this summer and we look forward to seeing everyone in a few weeks at school!

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Categories: adventure, Animals, camp, Children, conservation, education, endangered species, Environment, nature, oceans, science, Today's Post, wildlife | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Fishy has Red Teeth

Fishy has Red Teeth

We’re meeting one of our favorite fish of the reef today! They are funny and crazy and yes- they have a red tooth.

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REDTOOTHED TRIGGERFISH: 

  • These blue- purple flat oval shaped fish our found in Indo-Pacific coral reefs.
  • They have tiny sharp red teeth.
  • Redtoothed triggerfish make grunt noises.
  • They can change their color depending on their mood, food or the quality of the water.
  • These cute fish use their dorsal and tail fins to swim. It is a very unusual swim style.
  • They mostly eat plankton, but are known to eat sponges, small fish and squid.
  • Females lay their eggs and guard the nest before they hatch.

 

We just love these funny fish and their little red teeth and cool swimming style! How about you?

Categories: adventure, Animals, camp, Children, conservation, education, Environment, fish, nature, oceans, science, Today's Post, wildlife | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Fishy Tang

Fishy Tang

It’s the last week of Camp of E&E! We’re going snorkeling all week to meet some colorful reef fish! So pack your bags, we’re loading up on the big boat! Today we’re meeting a tang fish!

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POWDER BLUE TANG FUN FACTS: 

  • Powder blue tangs are members of the surgeonfish family.
  • Powder blue tangs are gorgeous! These flat oval shaped fish have blue, black, white and yellow colors.
  • They stay these colors their whole life.
  • Like other surgeonfish- they have a spine at the base of their tail that they can use for defense.
  • They are herbivores- eating algae off the reef.
  • They are diurnal.
  • Powder blue tangs are solitarily and territorial.

 

These are such gorgeous reef fish. Their relatives include the Royal Blue Tang (Dory from Finding Nemo) and yellow tangs who are popular in aquariums.

Categories: adventure, Animals, camp, Children, conservation, education, Environment, nature, oceans, science, Today's Post, wildlife | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

It’s the Gong Show!

It’s the Gong Show!

Ok, it’s not the Gong Show, it’s the Wobbegong Show! The Wobbegong Shark Show that is!                 This is one of our favorite sharks! These masters of camouflage are so cool and funny looking- they’re like Muppet sharks- hehehehe!

Wobbegong Shark

 

Wobbegong Fun Facts:

  • The carpet sharks are found on the ocean floor.
  • Wobbegong comes from the aboriginal word for shaggy beard.
  • These carnivores eat octopus, crustaceans and fish.
  • They are ambush predators, who lay in waiting for prey to swim by.
  • The little whiskers are sensory barbs.
  • Wobbegongs are found in the Pacific & Indian Oceans.
  • Like other carpet sharks, wobbegongs have spiracles that pass water over their gills when they are resting on the ocean floor.
  • Wobbegongs are mostly nocturnal.

 

When we think of sharks, we think of the great white and that typical shape. But sharks come in all shapes and sizes. We love their diversity! Do you have a favorite shark? We hope you have enjoyed shark week here at Camp E&E!

Categories: adventure, Animals, camp, Children, conservation, education, endangered species, Environment, nature, oceans, science, sharks, Today's Post, wildlife | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

That is One Big Shark

That is One Big Shark

We are meeting the biggest shark and the biggest fish in the ocean on the 3rd day of shark week! These spotty gentle giants are amazing and we’re excited to share more about them with our campers!

Whale shark, Rhincodon typus, at Daedalus in the Egyptian Red Sea.

WHALE SHARK FUN FACTS: 

  • These plankton eaters filter their food from the oceans, unlike most of their other shark relatives.
  • Whale sharks call tropical waters around the world home.
  • They are known to migrate to find good food sources.
  • The largest fish in the world can grow up to 40 ft long.
  • Like the mako shark, the whale shark is ovoviviparous. They incubate eggs inside and give birth to live young. They can give birth to several hundreds of pups.
  • Whale sharks are covered in spots and each shark’s spots have a unique pattern.
  • Scientist use those spot patterns to ID individuals and study their populations.
  • These giants are listed as ENDANGERED by the IUCN.

 

Whale sharks are thought to have been swimming the world’s oceans for around 60 million years. They weren’t discovered by humans til the 1800s! Because they are popular to swim with in the wild, they are more valuable alive than dead (or for meat). In most places they are protected, which is great, because we couldn’t imagine the oceans without them.

 

 

Categories: adventure, Animals, camp, Children, conservation, education, endangered species, Environment, fish, nature, oceans, science, sharks, Today's Post, wildlife | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Built for Speed

Built for Speed

We’ll be meeting some excellent species and of course our friend Chompy will stop by! Make sure you check out our Instagram for some fun videos and extra pictures! Today we are meeting one of the fastest sharks in the ocean- the shortfin mako! Let’s learn more about this speed demon!

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SHORTFIN MAKO FUN FACTS:

  • These sleek sharks are found in temperate and tropical oceans worldwide.
  • They can grow up to 12 feet and weigh up to 1,200 lbs.
  • Shortfin makos can swim up 45 mph, making them the fastest shark in the oceans.
  • They are also known for their ability to leap out of water.
  • These carnivores primarily eat boney fish- like tuna. They are apex predators and have no natural predators.
  • Makos are migratory and some individuals are known to make year long migrations.
  • They have a special blood vessel system that helps them keep their body temperature higher than the surrounding water- allowing them to hunt in cold waters.
  • Makos give birth to live young, but they are ovoviviparous- the eggs incubate inside the female and the young feed off any unfertilized eggs.

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These fast predators are listed at VULNERABLE by the IUCN. They are fished for their meat and for their fins. When an apex predator such as the mako is removed from its ecosystem it can be disastrous. To learn how you can help sharks like the mako, check out Shark Savers. 

 

Categories: adventure, Animals, camp, Children, conservation, education, endangered species, Environment, fish, nature, oceans, science, sharks, Today's Post, wildlife | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

KNOW YOUR SHARKS

KNOW YOUR SHARKS

We enjoyed meeting our cephalopod friends last week- did you? This week we’re partying with the elasmobranchs – that’s right it’s Shark Week! Come learn more about these cartilaginous fish with us.

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SHARK FUN FACTS: 

  • Shark skeletons are made of cartilage, the same tissue that makes up human noses and ears. Their teeth do have enamel, which is why they fossilize.
  •  Sharks have a special organ called the Ampullae of Lorenzini. This organ is compromised of small gel filled spots around the shark’s mouth, eyes and nose. The ampullae Of Lorenzini helps the shark detect electromagnetic fields and water temperature.
  • Most sharks have excellent eyesight. They can see in color and in low light.
  • Sharks have called the oceans home for 500 million years.
  • The largest fish in the ocean is a shark! It’s the Whale Shark!
  • Some sharks, like great whites, must swim continually to live. They must swim to move water over their gills. Other sharks, like nurse sharks, have spiracles that move the water over their gills. Spiracles allow the shark to lay still on the ocean floor.
  • Some sharks can go through 35,000 teeth in a lifetime. Those teeth are in rows similar to a conveyer belt; when one falls out, the new one moves forward.
  • Not all sharks have teeth though- those large whale sharks eat plankton that they filter.
  • Giving birth is different for different species of sharks! Some sharks lay eggs (oviparous) called mermaid purses. Some sharks incubate the eggs inside their bodies and give live birth (ovoviviparity). And some sharks have a placental organ that attached to the egg and they give live birth (viviparity).

 

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Wow! Sharks are such diverse and amazing creatures- you could spend a whole summer at camp just talking about these fantastic fish, sadly we only have a week! Any guess on some of the species will meet in the next few days?

Categories: adventure, Animals, camp, Children, conservation, education, Environment, fish, nature, oceans, science, sharks, Today's Post, wildlife | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

BOO!

BOO!

We’re meeting a fantastic little crustacean today! They are almost as much fun to watch on the beach as the birds. Come learn about the little crabs who say BOO! Hehehe!

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GHOST CRAB FUN FACTS: 

  • Ghost crabs are found in burrows they dig in the sand.
  • Their burrows entrances are dug at angle to allow air to flow in. They can be as deep as 4 ft.
  • These omnivores eat insects, clams and other small crabs.
  • They have 360 degree vision- so they can spot predators.
  • They are mostly nocturnal, but they can be spotted during the day- cleaning out their burrows.
  • Ghost crabs are solitary and do not share their burrows.
  • They do need to keep their gills moist and can be found at the water’s edge sometimes just buried in the sand.

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When a little ghost crab comes up behind you and says BOO! Don’t be afraid- they are just playing!

Categories: adventure, Animals, camp, Children, conservation, Environment, nature, oceans, science, Today's Post, wildlife | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Suzi and the Sand Dunes

Suzi and the Sand Dunes

We haven’t had a camp fire story this whole summer! We’re sharing a story we’ve shared before!

 

Suzi and Sand Dune Nightmare:

On an evening just like tonight a camper named Suzi, decided to go explore the beach during the night. She wanted to watch a sea turtle come ashore. She wasn’t sure she should go exploring by herself as it was against the rules, but the thought of seeing a mom sea turtle laying her eggs was so exciting that she couldn’t contain herself. She gathered her red flashlight and quietly left her tent.

Suzi walked quietly up the beach as not to disturb any turtles or any of the campers. It was hard to see in the dark night and Suzi was not feeling as brave as she wandered father from camp. She was getting cold and she didn’t see a single turtle in the dark of night. She heard a noise from the dunes and she decided to walk back to camp as quickly as possible.  As she walked back she noticed a red glow coming from the sand dunes. She stopped; camp counselors had told everyone that the dunes were off limits, day or night and any camper that went in to them would be sent home. Suzi wanted to investigate where the red light was coming from, but she didn’t want to get in trouble. No one had noticed that she was gone so far, so what would a few more minutes hurt. She couldn’t think of animal that would give off a red glow like that. What if she were to discover a new species? Then no one would be mad at her for going into the dunes, even at night. Her fears slipped away as curiosity and excitement led her in the direction of the dunes and the red glow.

Suzi headed into the dunes with some trepidation. There were predators that lived in these dunes and it was darker back here.  As she walked farther from the sounds of the ocean and deeper in to the dunes; the tall, sharp blades of sea grass cut Suzi on her arms and legs. She could barely see movement of small animals around her in the pitch black night. Those were just regular old ghost crabs and mice Suzi thought. No need to fear them. Suddenly, there was a noise to her right, something much larger! This was no ghost crab coming out of its burrow.  Suzi was beginning to get scared and wanted to go back to her safe tent at camp. As her fear grew, she realized she had lost the red glowing light she’d seen earlier. She looked around and all she could see were sand dunes, sea grass and dark of night. Her heart began to race as the noise grew louder and closer. It’s too big to be a fox, but it could be a coyote she thought.  Suzi knew she did not want to encounter a coyote.  She was lost in the middle of the dunes and she was beginning to panic. The noise from the large animal grew louder and closer yet again! Suzi started to run, but the dunes are no place to run- there were crabs and birds’ nests and all of those sharp sea grass blades. She felt as if she were running in place. As the noise grew closer, Suzi stopped. Instinct told her to get low, so she squatted down as she shook with fear. She was covered in sweat and cuts from the sea grass. Quietly she sat in the dunes with the ghost crabs crawling all around her. For a moment the steps had stopped. Maybe the animal had given up and left. But as soon as Suzi decided to stand up, she could her the footsteps coming closer and closer…

 

 

 

Uh oh! What happened to Suzi? Do you think a coyote got her? Or maybe a secret sand dune monster! We’ll tell you the answer if you ask us on Twitter or Facebook! Time for lights out campers! And stay out of the dunes! Hahahaha!

 

Categories: adventure, Animals, camp, Children, conservation, education, Environment, nature, oceans, science, Today's Post, wildlife | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Sand Dunes

Sand Dunes

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Sand dunes fun facts:

  • Dunes are formed from wind and the tides. They are constantly changing and moving.
  • They protect the inland from storms and high winds.
  • Dunes are home to many animals including, reptiles, birds, mammals and invertebrates.
  • They provide good protection for animal nurseries. Babies are well camouflaged and hidden away from the open beach.
  • Just at the edge of the dunes is where female sea turtles lay their eggs.
  • Grasses that grow in the dunes, protect them from erosion. They have very shallow root systems though and walking on the dunes for even a few feet can destroy an entire grass colony.

You can find birds, insects, invertebrates, mammals and birds throughout the dunes. You can also usually spot wildflowers and other plants along with the grass. These are some of the animals you can see on the dunes:

Marsh Rabbit!

Marsh Rabbit!

Eastern Diamondback Rattle Snake (found on the south eastern coast of the U.S.)

Eastern Diamondback Rattle Snake (found on the south eastern coast of the U.S.)

 

 

 

 

 

 

Piping plovers are shore birds. They lay their nests near or in the dunes.

Piping plovers are shore birds. They lay their nests near or in the dunes.

 

You can often spot ghost crabs and the holes that lead to their burrows in the dunes!

You can often spot ghost crabs and the holes that lead to their burrows in the dunes!

Purple sandpipers are another bird you'll find!

Purple sandpipers are another bird you’ll find!

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Categories: adventure, Animals, camp, Children, conservation, education, endangered species, Environment, nature, oceans, science, Today's Post, wildlife | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

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