Posts Tagged With: fish

You Say Fish- We Say Tomato

You Say Fish- We Say Tomato

We’re meeting our last animal of Camp E&E today :(. Can you believe summer is nearly over? It has flown by! We’ll be starting the new year back at the University after Labor Day- so be on the look out for some great new friends!

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TOMATO ANEMONE FISH FUN FACTS: 

  • Like their famous relatives, the clownfish, tomato anemone fish spend most of their  time in the tentacles of an anemone.
  • The anemone protects the tomato fish from predators, while the fish provides the anemone leftovers of its food. This relationship is called symbiosis- mutualism.
  • Males are smaller than females and are bright red. The females tend be more black in color than red.
  • The most dominate fish is the largest female.
  • All anemone fish start out as males and will turn female when they need to.
  • These little fish only grow to 5 1/2 inches.

 

Anemone fish are the cutest little fish. It’s cool that they have a symbiotic relationship with anemones. We’ll be back tomorrow for our big send off at Camp!

 

Categories: adventure, Animals, camp, Children, conservation, education, Environment, fish, nature, oceans, science, Today's Post, wildlife | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Fishy has Red Teeth

Fishy has Red Teeth

We’re meeting one of our favorite fish of the reef today! They are funny and crazy and yes- they have a red tooth.

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REDTOOTHED TRIGGERFISH: 

  • These blue- purple flat oval shaped fish our found in Indo-Pacific coral reefs.
  • They have tiny sharp red teeth.
  • Redtoothed triggerfish make grunt noises.
  • They can change their color depending on their mood, food or the quality of the water.
  • These cute fish use their dorsal and tail fins to swim. It is a very unusual swim style.
  • They mostly eat plankton, but are known to eat sponges, small fish and squid.
  • Females lay their eggs and guard the nest before they hatch.

 

We just love these funny fish and their little red teeth and cool swimming style! How about you?

Categories: adventure, Animals, camp, Children, conservation, education, Environment, fish, nature, oceans, science, Today's Post, wildlife | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Fishy Tang

Fishy Tang

It’s the last week of Camp of E&E! We’re going snorkeling all week to meet some colorful reef fish! So pack your bags, we’re loading up on the big boat! Today we’re meeting a tang fish!

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POWDER BLUE TANG FUN FACTS: 

  • Powder blue tangs are members of the surgeonfish family.
  • Powder blue tangs are gorgeous! These flat oval shaped fish have blue, black, white and yellow colors.
  • They stay these colors their whole life.
  • Like other surgeonfish- they have a spine at the base of their tail that they can use for defense.
  • They are herbivores- eating algae off the reef.
  • They are diurnal.
  • Powder blue tangs are solitarily and territorial.

 

These are such gorgeous reef fish. Their relatives include the Royal Blue Tang (Dory from Finding Nemo) and yellow tangs who are popular in aquariums.

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Meet a Hog?

Meet a Hog?

We’re back on the Camp E&E boat today to meet some other fish! We may even done our snorkeling gear tomorrow! Today we’re saying hello to a species that is named after another farm animal- but this time they are named after a hog!

 

Meet the Hogfish

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FUN FACTS:

  • Hogfish have long snouts that they use to root around the ocean floor looking for prey.
  • They often make a grunting noise when looking for food too. This is where they get their famous name- the hogfish.
  • These carnivores are big fans of crustaceans.
  • Hogfish are Sequential hermaphrodites. That means they change their sex during their lifetime. All hogfish start off as female and change to male as they mature.
  • Males have a large black spot on their behind their pectoral fin and are a bright orange or red. Females are grey or brown.
  • They are members of the wrasse family, but are closely related to parrotfish.
  • These popular recreational fish are listed as Vulnerable by the IUCN. The number of individuals that are fished is controlled to avoid overfishing.

 

Categories: adventure, Animals, camp, Children, conservation, education, endangered species, Environment, nature, oceans, science, Today's Post, wildlife | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Moo?

Moo?

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Hello campers! We’re heading out on a boat ride today to meet one of animals that calls the ocean just offshore from camp home.  Any guess on the elasmobranch we’re going to meet from our title clue? Could cow be in the name?

 

Meet the Cownose Ray

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Fun Facts: 

  • These adorable rays are named after that blunt square- cow shaped nose.
  • They are typically found near the surface of the ocean.
  • Cownose rays give birth to a live pup once a year.
  • These carnivores feed on oysters, clams and other mollusks. They have crushing plates – not teeth- to crush open shells and get to the soft bodies of their prey.
  • They do have mildly venomous barbs, but only use those when threatened. When rays are known to be in local waters, its a good idea to shuffle your feet when walking in the ocean as to not step on one accidentally.
  • These little sea flapper (hehehe) flap their fins to swim. They belong to their own group of rays.
  • These cartilaginous (skeletons made of cartilage) fish, are known for their migrations from the Gulf of Mexico to the Chesapeake Bay. They can be seen in schools with up to 10,000 individuals.

These amazing animals are one of our favorites. They are often spotted in aquariums too. Like other rays they have spiracles that pass water over their gills when they rest on the bottom of the ocean.

 

 

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Warty Fish

Warty Fish

Today we are meeting one ugly but neat fish today! These funny looking fish are named the Warty Frog Fish! Come learn more about them with us.

 

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Warty Frogfish Fun Facts: 

  • These warty frogfish grows up to 6 inches long.
  • They are covered in little bumps called spindles.
  • They have large mouths that allow them to eat prey as large as themselves. These carnivores eat anything that comes their way.
  • After a few weeks of life they have the ability to change color to match their surroundings.
  • They have a lure on their head they use to catch prey with.
  • Warty frogfish are also biofluorescent. They have proteins that absorb electromagnetic waves and they emit that light in a different color.

Warty frogfish are so amazing! Can you imagine absorbing electromagnetic waves and then glowing? It is so neat!

Categories: adventure, Animals, camp, Children, conservation, education, Environment, fish, nature, oceans, science, Today's Post, wildlife | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , | 2 Comments

Puff the Magic Fishy

Puff the Magic Fishy

We are super excited to introduce you to today’s fish! This adorable little creature is called the Dog-Faced Puffer Fish! Are you ready campers?

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Dog-Faced Puffer Fish: 

  • These little puffer fish grow to about a foot long.
  • They are also known as the black spotted puffer fish.
  • These crazy fish are not covered in scales, but have smooth skin.
  • These carnivores eat everything from worms to coral.
  • Dog-faced puffer fish are solitary and territorial.
  • They do not have pelvic fins.

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We just love these funny looking puffer fish. They can inflate to twice their size when threatened by predators. That may be one of the coolest adaptations ever!

Categories: adventure, Animals, camp, Children, conservation, education, Environment, fish, nature, oceans, science, Today's Post, wildlife | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , | 1 Comment

Walking Fish

Walking Fish

We are so excited to be back snorkeling with our campers after shark week! Chompy will be back later next week! Today we are meeting a strange but super cool fish today. And yes is it known to walk and not swim!

Longnose batfish on Bari Reef, Bonaire

 

Longnosed Batfish Fun Facts: 

  • Longnosed batfish can grow up to 12 inches long.
  • These crazy looking creatures use their side fins to “walk” along the sand floor.
  • They lay in wait for prey to swim by. They can can detect prey with the small antennae on their head.
  • They can range in color from yellowish to purple with small spots. They have red-orange lips.’
  • They are carnivores that eat fish, crustaceans and shellfish.
  • They are in the same family as of the anglerfish.
  • They are listed as Least Concern by the IUCN.

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These strange and amazing creatures have filled a nook in the environment that other fish have not. They prey on animals at the bottom. While most fish swim higher in the water column, batfish “walk” along the floor. It’s an amazing adaptation if you ask us! Think batfish celebrate Halloween?

Categories: adventure, Animals, camp, Children, conservation, education, Environment, fish, nature, oceans, science, Today's Post, wildlife | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , | 1 Comment

When You Put a Fish in a Box

When You Put a Fish in a Box

Hehehehe! We’re just kidding- we’re not putting fish in boxes today, but we are going snorkeling and meeting the boxfish! You campers may remember meeting Barry the Boxfish on World’s Oceans Day. Today we’re going to learn more about them.

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Boxfish Fun Facts: 

  • Boxfish can grow up to 18 inches.
  • These little omnivores eat algae, worms and crustaceans.
  • Boxfish are bright yellow as juvinelles. They get darker as they get older.
  • That bright coloration is called warning coloration. It serves as a warning to predators that it is toxic.
  • Boxfish excreate poison when threatened.
  • They are solitary.

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We love these cube shaped fish. A car company even thought their funny shape would make for a good car design. We wonder if they added the fins?

Categories: adventure, Animals, camp, Children, conservation, education, Environment, fish, nature, oceans, science, Today's Post, wildlife | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , | 1 Comment

Happy World Oceans Day!

Happy World Oceans Day

Categories: adventure, Animals, Children, conservation, education, endangered species, Environment, fish, movies, nature, oceans, Today's Post, wildlife, Worlds Oceans Day | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , | 1 Comment

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