Posts Tagged With: children

Pipe Up for Sandpipers

Pipe Up for Sandpipers

Another popular bird that we love to watch run up and down the beach is the sandpiper. They are so funny with their little legs and high speed running! Let’s learn more about them.

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SPOTTED SANDPIPER FUN FACTS:

  • These funny little birds have an usual mating style. The females actually establish territory for nests.
  • The males incubate the eggs and raise the young. Sometimes females will help.
  • Females can actually lay several clutches of eggs in a season- often from different males. Each male that fathered the clutch will rear those chicks.
  • Sandpipers are known for their teetering motion. It is not known why they do this.
  • These little carnivores eat insects – including flying ones and crustaceans buried in the sand.
  • They are listed as Least Concern by the IUCN.

 

Who knew these little birds have such neat role reversals? Lady sandpipers are pretty cool as are the busy males!

Categories: adventure, Animals, birds, camp, Children, conservation, education, nature, oceans, science, Today's Post, wildlife | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

You Won’t Egret It

You Won’t Egret It

We’re meeting a wonderful shore bird today. These bright white beauties are hard to miss and one of our favorites.

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GREAT EGRET FUN FACTS:

  • These wading birds are found on coasts, lakes and rivers. Like their cousins the heron, they can be found in fresh, brackish and salt water.
  • Great egrets are carnivores. They use their big pointy beaks to grab fish, crustaceans and amphibians.
  • During mating season, egrets grow extra plums on their backs to attract mates.
  • These majestic birds have a wingspan of up to 57 inches. They are large, but slow fliers.
  • Almost hunted to extinction for their feathers, the birds have made a strong comeback due to protection efforts.
  • They are also the symbol of the National Audubon Society.

We love these birds as much as we love the Great Blue Heron. Luckily they are easy to spot with their bright white feathers.

 

Categories: adventure, Animals, birds, camp, Children, conservation, education, Environment, nature, rivers, science, Today's Post, wetlands, wildlife | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

This is Urchin!

This is Urchin!

Hehehe! We love a good pun! Ok, well maybe learning about our last echinoderm the sea urchin, isn’t so urgent, but it is cool!

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SEA FUN FACTS:

  • Like their other echinoderm relatives, sea urchins are divided in to equal parts- being 5.
  • They have 5 rows of tube feet with suckers on the end that they use to move and then attach to rocks or the ocean floor.
  • All urchins have spines, but not all of them are venomous.
  • These omnivores eat plankton and algae. In turn they are prey for other animals including otters and sun stars.
  • The sea urchin’s mouth is on the bottom of their body and their bum is on the top.
  • Urchin is an old word for hedgehog. Named after the spiny mammal, you could technically call them sea hedgehogs!
  • Sand dollars are actually a type of urchin!
  • Sea urchins also have tiny claws in between their spines. They use these to help protect them and to hold shells and other objects to help them camouflage.

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Sea urchins are really cool for an animal that looks just like a colorful pin cushion! These amazing creatures can live up to 30 years and the Red Sea urchin is known to live up to 200 years. Crazy!!!

Categories: adventure, Animals, camp, Children, conservation, education, Environment, nature, oceans, science, Today's Post, wildlife | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Don’t Eat that Cucumber

Don’t Eat that Cucumber

Who’s excited to meet today’s echinoderm? It’s a pretty crazy looking one! Let’s meet the sea cucumber!

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SEA CUCUMBER FUN FACTS:

  • Sea cucumbers have tentacles around their mouths. They use those to grab small waste materials or tiny animals in the oceans.
  •  Sea cucumbers can discharge a sticky substance to ward off predators. They can also expel their internal organs to deter a predator. Don’t worry They regenerate those.
  • They have no faces or eyes.
  • Sea cucumbers take in water through their bum to extract oxygen using respiratory trees.
  • They also poop calcium carbonate, a building material for coral.
  • These not too exciting animals are important for breaking down too much organic material in the ocean floor. They are often called nature’s vacuum cleaners.

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While they don’t look like much and really they aren’t much more that a tubular eating & pooping machine, they are one of the oceans’ under appreciated animals.

 

Categories: adventure, Animals, camp, Children, conservation, education, endangered species, Environment, nature, oceans, science, Today's Post, wildlife | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

We Spy What Cephalopod

We Spy What Cephalopod

We are giving you some clues to see if you can guess the cephalopod we are meeting today!

  • We spy a cephalopod who calls the deep ocean its home.
  • We spy a cephalopod that is rarely seen.
  • We spy a cephalopod with 40 ft arms.
  • We spy a cephalopod who has the longest tentacles of any cephalopod species.
  • We spy a cephalopod who has the largest eyes of any animal in the world.
  • We spy a cephalopod who is well known in stories and literature.

 

Can you guess who we spy?

Scroll down to see the answer.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

It’s the Giant Squid!

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Categories: adventure, Animals, camp, Children, conservation, education, Environment, nature, oceans, science, Today's Post, wildlife | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Know Your Cephalopods

KNOW YOUR CEPHALOPODS

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It’s Cephalopod Week here at Camp E&E and all over! We’ll be learning more about our mollusk friends, don’t worry we’ll get back to our Echinoderm friends soon.

CEPHALOPOD FUN FACTS:  

  • Cephalopods are marine mollusks. This means they are related snails and nudibranchs (distantly).
  • Cephalopods include octopus, cuttlefish, nautilus and squid.
  • All cephalopods have a head with eyes, a mantle that holds their organs and beak like mouth. Cephalopods are invertebrates- meaning they have no bones.
  • Cephalopod limbs are attached to their heads.
  • Octopus have 8 arms – yep they are called arms. Their arms are covered in suckers.
  • Cuttlefish and squid have 8 arms and 2 tentacles.
  • Nautilus have many tentacles and have no suckers. They unlike other cephalopods, have an outer shell.
  • Cephalopods only live a year or two, except nautilus who live around 15 years.
  • Cephalopods can change the color and texture of their skin to camouflage with their environment.
  • Cephalopods have been around for about 500 million years.
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Know Your Echinoderms

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Echinoderm Fun Facts: 

  • Echinoderms include sea stars, brittle and basket stars, sea urchins and sand dollars and sea cucumbers. 
  • They have been around for around 500 million years.
  • Their name comes from Greek and means urchin and skin. They all have spines- some larger and sharper than others.
  • Most Echinoderms have radial symmetry- body parts are arranged around a central point. 
  • Echinoderms do not have blood- they use water to circulate throughout their body. Water also helps them move their tube feet which they use for locomotion. 
  • Some Echinoderms can regenerate their body parts. Sea stars are known for regrowing arms. 

We’ll meet some neat Echinoderms this summer at camp? Do you have a favorite? We love sea stars and sand dollars in particular. 

Categories: adventure, Animals, camp, Children, conservation, education, Environment, nature, oceans, science, sea stars, Today's Post, wildlife | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Hello Sea Snail

Hello Sea Snails

After our boat ride – we met a little creature buried in the sand right at the waves line of the beach. It’s amazing what you’ll find when you are looking.  These snails have great shells and again have cow in their name! Do we see a theme here at camp so far? Hehehehe!

Meet the Atlantic Deer Cowrie

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FUN FACTS:

  • These cowries are one of the largest species of cowries and grow up to 7 1/2 inches.
  • These herbivores eat algae.
  • Cowries constantly clean their shells keeping them shiny.
  • Keeping their shells so shiny and smooth keeps barnacles and sponges from attaching.
  • Cowries are marine gastropods, or snails.
  • They have no operculum- a trap door or covering.
  • They have few predators, but some octopus can drill through the shell!

 

We love looking for shells on the shore. The rule is campers may take shells that have no animals in them. We’ll be learning more about shells at camp later! What’s your favorite shell to find on the beach?

 

 

 

Categories: adventure, Animals, camp, Children, conservation, education, Environment, nature, oceans, science, Today's Post, wildlife | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Camp E&E Info

Camp E&E Info

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Hello! We are so excited to have everyone join us this summer! We’re going to spend most of our time at Camp E&E by the sea this summer! First we want to go over some rules for all campers:

  • Be courteous & kind to all your fellow campers and animals.
  • Bring your reusable water and coffee mugs with you.
  • Leave all habitats the way you found them. Pick up all trash.
  • When packing for picnics, bring your reusable napkins, utensils and sandwich bags.
  • When visiting the beach at night, no pictures or lights are allowed. You must only use a red flashlight to not distract nesting sea turtles.
  • Campers may collect shells as long as they are empty.
  • Please do not feed wild animals.
  • Enjoy all activities and have fun!

 

We are so excited to meet our animal friends next week along with sharing stories, making s’mores by the campfire and making new friends! What are you most excited about?

 

Categories: adventure, Animals, camp, Children, conservation, education, Environment, mammals, nature, oceans, science, wildlife | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , | 1 Comment

Ox

Ox

We are meeting an animal that spends most of their life in the cold- the musk ox. These large mammal are so cool with their thick coats and horns! Let’s learn more about them.

 

 

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Categories: adventure, Animals, Children, conservation, education, Environment, nature, science, Today's Post, wildlife | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , | 1 Comment

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