Posts Tagged With: nature blogs

We Hate To Say Goodbye

We Hate to Say Goodbye

It’s that time of the summer, when our campers pack up their trunks, gear, photos and get ready to go home. It’s such a bittersweet time. We sure have enjoyed sharing the ocean and all its inhabitants with you this year.

What was your favorite memory of camp? Who was your favorite animal?

Thank you for joining us this summer and we look forward to seeing everyone in a few weeks at school!

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Categories: adventure, Animals, camp, Children, conservation, education, endangered species, Environment, nature, oceans, science, Today's Post, wildlife | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

You Say Fish- We Say Tomato

You Say Fish- We Say Tomato

We’re meeting our last animal of Camp E&E today :(. Can you believe summer is nearly over? It has flown by! We’ll be starting the new year back at the University after Labor Day- so be on the look out for some great new friends!

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TOMATO ANEMONE FISH FUN FACTS: 

  • Like their famous relatives, the clownfish, tomato anemone fish spend most of their  time in the tentacles of an anemone.
  • The anemone protects the tomato fish from predators, while the fish provides the anemone leftovers of its food. This relationship is called symbiosis- mutualism.
  • Males are smaller than females and are bright red. The females tend be more black in color than red.
  • The most dominate fish is the largest female.
  • All anemone fish start out as males and will turn female when they need to.
  • These little fish only grow to 5 1/2 inches.

 

Anemone fish are the cutest little fish. It’s cool that they have a symbiotic relationship with anemones. We’ll be back tomorrow for our big send off at Camp!

 

Categories: adventure, Animals, camp, Children, conservation, education, Environment, fish, nature, oceans, science, Today's Post, wildlife | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Fishy has Red Teeth

Fishy has Red Teeth

We’re meeting one of our favorite fish of the reef today! They are funny and crazy and yes- they have a red tooth.

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REDTOOTHED TRIGGERFISH: 

  • These blue- purple flat oval shaped fish our found in Indo-Pacific coral reefs.
  • They have tiny sharp red teeth.
  • Redtoothed triggerfish make grunt noises.
  • They can change their color depending on their mood, food or the quality of the water.
  • These cute fish use their dorsal and tail fins to swim. It is a very unusual swim style.
  • They mostly eat plankton, but are known to eat sponges, small fish and squid.
  • Females lay their eggs and guard the nest before they hatch.

 

We just love these funny fish and their little red teeth and cool swimming style! How about you?

Categories: adventure, Animals, camp, Children, conservation, education, Environment, fish, nature, oceans, science, Today's Post, wildlife | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Fishy Tang

Fishy Tang

It’s the last week of Camp of E&E! We’re going snorkeling all week to meet some colorful reef fish! So pack your bags, we’re loading up on the big boat! Today we’re meeting a tang fish!

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POWDER BLUE TANG FUN FACTS: 

  • Powder blue tangs are members of the surgeonfish family.
  • Powder blue tangs are gorgeous! These flat oval shaped fish have blue, black, white and yellow colors.
  • They stay these colors their whole life.
  • Like other surgeonfish- they have a spine at the base of their tail that they can use for defense.
  • They are herbivores- eating algae off the reef.
  • They are diurnal.
  • Powder blue tangs are solitarily and territorial.

 

These are such gorgeous reef fish. Their relatives include the Royal Blue Tang (Dory from Finding Nemo) and yellow tangs who are popular in aquariums.

Categories: adventure, Animals, camp, Children, conservation, education, Environment, nature, oceans, science, Today's Post, wildlife | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

It’s the Gong Show!

It’s the Gong Show!

Ok, it’s not the Gong Show, it’s the Wobbegong Show! The Wobbegong Shark Show that is!                 This is one of our favorite sharks! These masters of camouflage are so cool and funny looking- they’re like Muppet sharks- hehehehe!

Wobbegong Shark

 

Wobbegong Fun Facts:

  • The carpet sharks are found on the ocean floor.
  • Wobbegong comes from the aboriginal word for shaggy beard.
  • These carnivores eat octopus, crustaceans and fish.
  • They are ambush predators, who lay in waiting for prey to swim by.
  • The little whiskers are sensory barbs.
  • Wobbegongs are found in the Pacific & Indian Oceans.
  • Like other carpet sharks, wobbegongs have spiracles that pass water over their gills when they are resting on the ocean floor.
  • Wobbegongs are mostly nocturnal.

 

When we think of sharks, we think of the great white and that typical shape. But sharks come in all shapes and sizes. We love their diversity! Do you have a favorite shark? We hope you have enjoyed shark week here at Camp E&E!

Categories: adventure, Animals, camp, Children, conservation, education, endangered species, Environment, nature, oceans, science, sharks, Today's Post, wildlife | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Knot Birdy

Knot Birdy

It’s another day of watching birds and we’re meeting the Red Knot. Anyone have a guess how they got that name? Let’s find out!

 

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RED KNOT FUN FACTS:

  • These red birds are actually more grey most of the year. They develop that color during mating season.
  • They are found on every continent except Antartica.
  • It is thought that they get their name from the grunting noise they make.
  • Their numbers have fallen in North America due to population declines of one of their favorite prey- horseshoe crabs eggs.
  • These carnivores have special receptors in their beaks that help them detect pressure. These receptors help them find crustaceans buried in the sand.
  • Egrets eat their crustacean prey whole- shell and all. They crush the shells in their gizzard (a muscular part of their stomach), In fact, they have the largest gizzard of any shore bird.
  • They are listed as Near Threatened by the IUCN.

 

These adorable birds remind us of plovers a bit. It’s important that scientists are following population numbers as we are seeing a decline.  Remember to keep our shores clean of any trash, as plastics and other trash can harm our shore bird friends.

 

Categories: adventure, Animals, birds, camp, Children, conservation, education, endangered species, Environment, nature, oceans, science, Today's Post, wildlife | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

You Won’t Egret It

You Won’t Egret It

We’re meeting a wonderful shore bird today. These bright white beauties are hard to miss and one of our favorites.

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GREAT EGRET FUN FACTS:

  • These wading birds are found on coasts, lakes and rivers. Like their cousins the heron, they can be found in fresh, brackish and salt water.
  • Great egrets are carnivores. They use their big pointy beaks to grab fish, crustaceans and amphibians.
  • During mating season, egrets grow extra plums on their backs to attract mates.
  • These majestic birds have a wingspan of up to 57 inches. They are large, but slow fliers.
  • Almost hunted to extinction for their feathers, the birds have made a strong comeback due to protection efforts.
  • They are also the symbol of the National Audubon Society.

We love these birds as much as we love the Great Blue Heron. Luckily they are easy to spot with their bright white feathers.

 

Categories: adventure, Animals, birds, camp, Children, conservation, education, Environment, nature, rivers, science, Today's Post, wetlands, wildlife | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Hello Heron!

Hello Heron!

We are excited to meet some shore birds this week! There may be no better activity then to sit on the beach and watch the birds, especially the ones who run with the waves. Today we’re meeting a bird you’ll see in fresh, salt and brackish waters.

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MEET THE GREAT BLUE HERON:

  • Great blue herons call marshes, lakes, rivers and coast lines home.
  • These majestic birds are always fun to spot with their long necks and long legs.
  • They can stand 4 ft tall and have a 6 ft wing span.
  • They actually only weigh around 6 lbs! It sure helps to have hollow bones.
  • You can find herons hunting day or night. They have excellent night vision.
  • These carnivores wade in the water and wait for fish to grab, amphibians and crustaceans. They are surprisingly fast.
  • Their neck vertebrae are specially shaped to allow them to strike fast.

 

We love these amazing gorgeous birds. We never tire of seeing them whether on an hike or at the near by lake or here at Camp E&E by the Sea.

Categories: adventure, Animals, birds, camp, Children, conservation, education, Environment, nature, oceans, science, Today's Post, wildlife | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Stars of the Sea

Stars of the Sea

We have met sea stars before, but we wanted to learn more about these amazing echinoderms at camp today!

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SEA STAR FUN FACTS: 

  • There are around 2,000 species of sea stars.
  • Some species live up to 35 years.
  • They have no brains or blood. They use water throughout their vascular system. The water also helps them move their tube feet.
  • Sea stars do have simple eyes that see light and dark.
  • Sea stars have little plates of calcium carbonate to help protect them
  • These carnivores push their stomachs outside their mouths and digest their food before pulling the stomach back in the body.
  • Each arm of the sea star has around 15,000 tube feet. These feet secret a glue like substance to help them attach to rocks.
  • Some sea stars- like the sun star, can have up to 50 arms and weigh 11 lbs.
  • Like their relatives the brittle stars, they can regenerate arms.

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We love sea stars! They come in all sizes and colors- like pink, purple and blue! Do you have a favorite color sea star?

Categories: adventure, Animals, camp, Children, conservation, education, endangered species, Environment, nature, oceans, science, sea stars, Today's Post, wildlife | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Brittle Star

Brittle Star

Welcome back campers! We hope everyone had a great holiday off! We’re back at Camp E&E by the Sea to meet some of our echinoderm friends. Today we are meeting Brittany the brittle star.

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BRITTLE STAR FUN FACTS: 

  • These echinoderms are related to sea stars, but are not sea stars.
  • They are carnivores, that eat plankton and small crustaceans.
  • Brittle stars are found in the oceans all around the world from tide pools to the deep oceans.
  • There are 2,000 species of brittle stars in the ocean.
  • Brittle stars have a central disk that contains their mouth, which has 5 jaws.
  • Brittle stars have small spines on their arms.
  • Like their relatives, the sea stars- they can lose a limb and regenerate it.
  • They use their spiny arms and not tube feet to move.

 

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We love brittle stars. They are so cool looking! Maybe we should make some out of clay? Anyone up for that?

Categories: adventure, Animals, camp, Children, conservation, education, Environment, nature, oceans, science, Today's Post, wildlife | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

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