Posts Tagged With: environment

Whale Watching

Whale Watching

Today we hoped on a boat to go whale watching. There are several species of whales that call these icy waters home- at least for part of the year. We found the big marine mammals we were looking for- YAY!

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Southern Right Whale Fun Facts: 

  • These baleen whales can grow up to 59 ft and weigh up to 99 tons.
  • There baleen plates grow out of the upper jaw and are over 9 feet long.
  • They have white callusites on their heads and mouths. These are home to whale lice- which are related to shrimp.
  • These whales never leave the Southern Hemisphere.
  • They have large heads. The head makes up a 1/4 of their body length.
  • Southern right whales are also most identical to their Northern right whale cousins.
  • Southern right whales are more acrobatic. They are known to do “head stands” in the water and wave their flukes.

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We had fun spotting the whales. They are often seen near boats and ships. Unfortunately that can lead to run ins, so it is important for boats to watch for them.

Categories: adventure, Animals, Children, conservation, education, endangered species, Environment, mammals, nature, oceans, science, Today's Post, whales, wildlife | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , | 1 Comment

Where will the next E&E adventure be?

Where will the next E&E adventure be?

We heading towards the south, but not to tropical shores.

It is quiet a rugged place so it will not bore.

Get ready to put on your cold weather gear,

As we head to the place at the bottom of the sphere. 

Can you guess where we are? 

Share your answer on our social media sites! 

 

 

Categories: adventure, Animals, Children, conservation, education, endangered species, Environment, nature, science, Today's Post, wildlife | Tags: , , , , , , , , , | 1 Comment

Where will the next E&E adventure be?

Where will the next E&E adventure be?

We are heading off for our next adventure and it’s time to guess where it will be? Tell us here or on our social media and the first correct guess will win an E&E prize.

We are heading to a tropical place!

It has rainforests, volcanoes and beaches at the base!

The coasts meet the Carribbean and the Pacific.

They say it is quiet terrific.

Hummingbirds are all around.

Insects, spiders and butterflies abound.

A quarter of the country is protected.

All those things are connected.

Can you guess where we are? Come on and try! Let’s get this next adventure started!

Categories: adventure, Animals, Children, conservation, education, Environment, nature, oceans, science, Today's Post, wildlife | Tags: , , , , , , , , | 4 Comments

Halloween Week- Vampires

Halloween Week- Vampires

We are continuing the Halloween fun with some vampires of the ocean! That’s right- vampire squid!

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Vampire Squid Fun Facts: 

  • Vampire squid are black to red color.
  • They have skin that connects its eight arms.
  • Each arm has spines on it.
  • They eat marine animal debris that falls to the ocean floor.
  • Adults have two small fins on their mantle (head).
  • They are covered in light producing organs called photophores.
  • They are unable to change their skin color and texture like other squid.

Vampire squid are so amazing and weird! They call the dark deep ocean their home and it sure is a weird place!

Categories: adventure, Animals, Children, conservation, education, Environment, nature, oceans, science, Today's Post, wildlife | Tags: , , , , , , , , , | 1 Comment

Hello Kitty!

Hello Kitty!

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We are excited to meet our first animal of this year’s travels. We unpacked our gear at our camp. We’ll be exploring several kinds of habitats here the Southwest. We spent our first evening looking for a wild cat, the ocelot. These spotted cats roam in the southern most regions of the southwest. They are not easy to spot, but we were lucky and found one!

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Ocelot Fun Facts: 

  • Ocelots are mostly nocturnal. Like all cats, they are carnivores. They eat rabbits, rodents, birds and reptiles.
  • Ocelots can swim well.
  • Ocelots are mostly solitary. They scent mark their territories.
  • They are kept as pets, which is a very bad idea. They are not like your domestic housecat, They are strong and destructive. These cats belong in the wild.
  • They are know to be shy.
  • Females give birth to a litter in a den, where the cubs will stay til they around 3 months old.

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These small big cats are gorgeous. The were once listed as threatened by the IUCN because they were hunted for their coats. They still are losing habitat, but for now their populations are stable. Yay!!!

Categories: adventure, Animals, Children, conservation, education, endangered species, Environment, nature, science, Today's Post, wildlife | Tags: , , , , , , , , , | 1 Comment

Where will E&E’s next adventure be?

Where will E&E’s next adventure be?

Are you ready to guess where our October adventure will be? Read the clues and let us know your answer! The first to answer correctly on Instagram, Facebook, Twitter or here in the comments will get an E&E prize!

We are staying on the continent we call home.

It’s a large place to try and roam.

We are heading towards the west.

We hear it is quiet the best.

There are mountains in plain sight.

There are cactus standing in all their might.

Four deserts compromise the region.

Not it’s not Norwegian.

It can be very dry and rocky.

And for sure it is not Milwaukee.

The animals here are adapt to dry habitats.

There are birds, reptiles and even rats.

So can you guess where we are?

 

 

 

 

 

 

Categories: adventure, Animals, Children, conservation, education, Environment, nature, science, Today's Post, wildlife | Tags: , , , , , , , , | 1 Comment

Back to Basics- Habitats

Back to Basics- Habitats

We are winding down our back to basics month! We hope you have learned loads of great stuff! Today and tomorrow- we’ll be talking habitats! The earth is covered in all kinds of diverse habitats that we animals call home!

First up = terrestrial (land) habitats

Coniferous Forests: these cool dry forests are found in the northern hemisphere. They are home to trees that stay green all year round (evergreens). Wolves and moose call this their home.

coniferous forest

Deciduous Forest: these cool moist forests have trees that lose their leaves in the winter. The animals that live here change during the seasons. Bears call this forest home.

deciduous forest

Mountains: mountains have cold, steep and rocky areas. Animals that call the mountains their home must have great adaptations to survive harsh winters. The pika and mountain goat call this their home.

mountain

Temperate grasslands/prairies: these large prairies have large areas of grass for herbivores to eat. They have hot summers and cold winters. Bison call this their home. 

prairie

 

Tropical savannas: these tropical grasslands are found in Africa. There is a wet season and a dry season. Thousands of herbivores call this their home, including elephants.

savanna

Desert: these dry sandy rocky habitats have little plant life and little water. The animals that call this habitat home, like the camel, are adept at surviving without water for long periods.

desert

Polar ice: these cold icy habitats are found on the poles. Some animals who call this habitat home use the oceans to survive. They must have adaptations to survive cold temperatures.

polar

Tundra: this habitat is near the northern pole. It is frozen for most of the year, except spring and summer. Animals must migrate during winter to get food sources like grass. Reindeer call this their home.

tundra

Tropical rainforest: these lush habitats are found around the equator. They are warm and wet. They are the most bio-diverse habitats on earth. Thousands of species call the rainforest their home.

trop rainforest

 

 

Categories: adventure, Animals, Children, conservation, education, Environment, habitats, nature, science, Today's Post, wildlife | Tags: , , , , , , , , | 2 Comments

Back to Basics- Symbiosis

Back to Basics- Symbiosis

Symbiosis is a big word! Edmond thought he would teach you how to pronounce it before we explained more about it.

Symbiosis: interaction between two different organisms living in close physical association, typically to the advantage of both.

    -Mutualism: symbiosis that is beneficial to both organisms involved. (Ex- anemones and clownfish)

clown

     -Commensalism: a relationship between individuals of two species in which one species obtains food or other benefits from the other without either harming or benefiting the latter. (Ex- yellow tangs and sea turtle)

turtle

      -Parasitism: relationship in which one organism (the parasite) benefits and the other (the host) is generally harmed. Parasites derive nutrition from their host and may also gain other benefits such as shelter and a habitat in which to grow and reproduce. (Ex- barnacles)

barnacles

 

Now you know all about symbiosis, including how to pronounce it!

Categories: adventure, Animals, Children, conservation, education, Environment, nature, science, Today's Post, vocabulary, wildlife | Tags: , , , , , , , , , | 1 Comment

Back to Basics- Mammals

Back to Basics- Mammals

We are excited to talk the group of animals we belong to- mammals! Our professor of mammals- Bertie Bear will give us the low down.

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Number of mammal species- 4475. They occupy every kind of habitat on earth including oceans and the icy poles.

Mammal traits:

  • They have fur and/or hair. Even cetaceans have hair, generally a few chin hairs when they are born that fall out. Mammal fur/hair is made of the protein keratin, including whiskers, spines and rhino horns.
  • Mammals give birth to live young- except the platypus and echidna, who lay eggs.
  • They give milk to their young through mammary glands.
  • They are endothermic (warm blooded). They have sweat glands for regulating temperature. They must eat often to keep their body temperature regulated.
  • Mammals are vertebrates.  

 

Mammals have two layers of skin. The top layer is the epidermis that is made up of dead skin cell. The inner layer is the dermis, which contains glands. Some mammals use these glands to communicate with each other, by marking territory or giving off scents to attract mates, etc…

Mammals have three types of teeth and a jaw that is attached to the skull. The three types of teeth include molars, incisors and canines. Baleen whales have teeth that are made of keratin and are like brooms.

whale

Mammals give birth to live young, except for the monotremes- the platypus and the echinda lay eggs. Most mammals develop in a mother’s uterus, but the marsupials give birth to underdeveloped young that grow in a pouch- like kangaroos.

Mammals have several types of locomotion, including walking on all four feet- quadrupeds, walking on two feet- bipeds, flight- only bats and swimming with fins.

Many mammals are social and intelligent. In mammals, like the great apes,they even share culture with each other. Some mammals are known to be tool makers and tool users.

orangutan

Mammals make up the largest animals on the planet- the elephant is the largest land animal and the blue whale is the largest animal on earth! Mammals include you humans too!

 

Categories: adventure, Animals, Children, conservation, education, Environment, nature, science, Today's Post, wildlife | Tags: , , , , , , , , | 1 Comment

Back to Basics- Birds

Back to Basics- Birds

Our professor of birds is Professor Baxter and he is a Blue footed Booby! He’s going to share some basics about about birds!

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There are around 9,000 species of birds in the world. We are in every habitat on earth. Because we are so adaptable, we are considered the most successful animal on the planet. The earliest birds were descendants of the dinosaurs. Fossils of my long lost relatives have been found that are 150 million years old.

 first bird

What makes a bird a bird?

  • We have feathers. Our feathers are made from keratin.
  • We are endothermic (warm blooded).
  • We lay eggs.
  • We are vertebrates.
  • We have hollow bones. This helps us fly.
  • We have no teeth.

Feathers are our most distinctive feature. Feathers are made of keratin (the same protein that makes up human hair and nails). We have flight feathers on our wings. We have down feathers close to our body to keep us warm. Our tail feathers are made to help us fly. We must preen (clean) our feathers to keep them healthy. There are some birds who cannot fly including; kiwi, kakapo (the heaviest parrot on earth), penguins and ostrich.

kakapo

peguin

Our beaks/bills are also covered in keratin and they are shaped for what type of food we eat.

Instead of paws, we have feet. Our feet have 2 to 4 toes. Most of us have 4 toes, 3 that face forward and one that faces backward. This is perfect for sitting on tree branches. Those birds that spend time in water have webbed feet.

bird feet

We must keep our body temperature at 104 degrees. It is important that we control our heat loss.

Lastly, we lay eggs. Our mating rituals include dancing, songs and plumage displays. Our eggs are made of calcium carbonate. We lay eggs in nests, on rocks, on the beach and even on the ground. Some of us are born without feathers and our eyes closed. Some of us are, like ducks, are born with down feathers and our eyes open.

duck

 

Categories: adventure, Animals, birds, Children, conservation, education, Environment, nature, science, Today's Post, wildlife | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , | 1 Comment

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